Peace. Prayer. Productivity: California ‘day monastery’ melds prayer, work

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Susana Sweeters says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention 2015 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Church Planting 2018, June 11, 2018 at 5:50 pm This is an absolutely wonderful idea. If I did not live in México, I would be right there. As a retired person it also appeals to me very much, a place of prayer and silence, and also to check emails and conduct business online. Congratulations. The Spirit is with you and will provide many wonderful moments and opportunities. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 11, 2018 Deborah Kaufman Giordano, a healthcare recruiter and one of the co-creators of The Divine Office at St. Augustine by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Santa Monica, California, uses hymnals to convert a plastic card table into a desk for now, while money for renovation is still being raised. Photo courtesy of Katie CadiganEditor’s note: This story is part of a series profiling the Episcopal Church’s recent work planting new churches and other faith communities. Other stories about recipients of grants from the Episcopal Church’s Genesis Advisory Group on Church Planting can be found here. [Episcopal News Service] When Dennis Doherty found working from his West Los Angeles home too distracting and isolating, he went to coffee shops and even the local IHOP.Then he heard about The Divine Office (TDO) at St. Augustine by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Santa Monica, California, a few miles away. It blends monastic-style spirituality and the secular phenomenon of creative coworking spaces.Initially, “I wondered, what’s all this prayer business?” Doherty told the Episcopal News Service during a recent telephone interview. “Then I decided, well, if this is the price I have to pay for having a quiet place to work, I’ll check it out.”The Rev. Katie Cadigan, associate rector and TDO founder, views it as a “micro-monastic community” operating in underutilized rooms on St. Augustine’s campus.With growing numbers of people working remotely, Cadigan hoped the church’s location – a few blocks from the Pacific Ocean – and its available space would draw from the area’s boom in younger, home-based professionals.Funded, in part, through a $40,000 Episcopal Church New Church Start grant last year, TDO is “like a WeWork or like the people who work in Starbucks independently,” but whose participants pray several times daily, Cadigan said.The Rev. Katie Cadigan“This is kind of like a day monastery, where people will come to work and worship,” she said.“Instead of going off to a monastery, having a wonderful retreat and coming home and realizing, after a day, a week, all that good feeling and connection is gone, what if we brought monastery-like experiences into our everyday world? What if we wrapped and enveloped our work lives in prayer?”Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Diane Bruce, a TDO adviser, said the idea immediately intrigued her. “People working from their homes can be and feel so isolated, which is the opposite of what Jesus modeled in being in community,” she told ENS.“The Divine Office offers a space in which people can come together and connect – it is a holy space and time!”The Rev. Thomas Brackett, Episcopal Church manager for church planting and mission development, said TDO’s application captured the imagination of reviewers from the Genesis Advisory Group on Church Planting by saying basically, “We believe that a rhythm of life blesses anybody who engages this.“And, instead of waiting for people to come and learn our prayer book or the Daily Office, we want to take it to them in ways that are meaningful to them.”And that it’s a work in progress.“They said from the very beginning, we don’t know what that is going to look like yet, but if you are willing to venture with us, we’re going to figure it out and we will let you know what we learn,” Brackett said.Christopher Curzon, IT consultant (left), and Dennis Doherty, founder of DohertyTech GOSLYN (right), are two of more than a dozen co-creators of The Divine Office who working on rickety chairs and card tables while funds for renovation are being raised. Photo courtesy of Katie CadiganA work in progressDoherty is among at least a dozen TDO “co-creators” who meet once, sometimes twice weekly and who take turns leading intervals of morning, noonday and closing prayers.Another member of the group, Deborah Kaufman Giordano, president and founder of Healthcare Recruiting Inc. especially appreciated that “not everything needed to be perfect to start this community plant. … We didn’t have to have it all figured out on day one.”While at times working with laptops on card tables and spotty internet has a rough-around-the-edges feel, the collective wisdom of the group of writers, filmmakers, editors and others is rewarding, said Giordano, who is married to actor James Giordano, of “Twin Peaks” fame.“TDO is making a huge difference in my life, and holds the potential of making a big difference in the lives of others … by balancing our work lives with our God-lives,” Giordano said. “This isn’t a space where we are trying to convert anyone. We never ever proselytize. But … I’m working on not compartmentalizing God, not pushing God into a box where I only reflect on Him maybe once a week, in Sunday worship. It gives me hope.”Currently, the group meets on Thursdays and some Tuesdays. Eventually, the goal is to expand to five days a week.Madeline Stewart, storyteller and community builder, coleads one of the three prayer and meditation services that envelop each workday at The Divine Office. Photo courtesy of Katie CadiganThe days begin with 9 a.m. Morning Prayer and have fallen into a rhythm of morning prayers and a lifting up of daily intentions.A bell chimes at noon to signal worship, and everyone “puts down the laptop,” Cadigan said. “They do not finish the email they were typing. Just like monks way back when would not finish their calligraphy. They would put down the pen, and at the sound of the bell, go into the chapel and do prayer meditation.”Noonday prayers are a “kind of check-in, a where we’re at right now vis-à-vis what we’d prayed for in the morning … and people are in gratitude,” Giordano said.Lunch is fluid; some people bring sack meals. Others walk the four blocks to the Santa Monica Pier or to local restaurants. Closing prayers are typically around 4 p.m., “the group decides when … and the prayers are more around reintegrating with the world or family or what’s next on the horizon,” Cadigan said.She joins the group for their regular prayer intervals, but “I have never, ever led prayer,” Cadigan said. “My role is as a visionary and a shepherd. The challenge is, how do I grow this organically and listen to the Spirit, so the gifts people have in the community can rise up and flourish in the ways the Spirit calls them to grow.”The TDO’s pattern is a modern-day take on the traditional daily round of prayer known as the Divine Office, the Liturgy of the Hours, or the Daily Office, which has been practiced since the earliest days of the Christian church. The practice has its roots in the ancient Jewish custom of offering prayers and psalms periodically throughout the day.Doherty, a distributor for restaurant environmental waste management systems, said he usually schedules his workweek around TDO, and spends his time there invoicing clients and responding to emails.“The good news is, the prayer has become very important to me. It’s not the price to pay for having a quiet place to work,” he told ENS during a telephone interview from Ireland, where he was vacationing. “Prayer is really part of the appeal and the value … so it’s pretty exciting.”Jesus as a co-workerCadigan, 56, began the TDO startup in August 2017, recruiting Giordano, 53, and Doherty, 64, both St. Augustine’s members.Over time, and with a more reliable internet connection, Cadigan anticipates that gradually, TDO’s reach will expand, hopefully, to a broader base, “since the nature of independent work is that you are not showing up every day.”For example, “there’s a writer who’s now in Atlanta, a filmmaker who just got back from several months in Cambodia filming, and another one in Boston editing, so the day-to-day makeup is a bit more fluid.”There are also physical plant and financial issues: a future building renovation is planned, and plans are in the works for that more reliable internet access as well as a campaign to raise the additional $220,000 needed to finance it all. Eventually, a membership fee will be charged to help defray those costs.Unanticipated, but necessary additions will include “phone booths” for private calls and even a shower. “The first week, we had a guy go swimming and then come up and work,” Cadigan recalled, chuckling. “So, we discovered we’re going to need a shower … and a feeding station.”She also discovered that “a good number of people who work and worship with us for just one or two days experience a spiritually meaningful shift of some sort and emerge seeing The Divine Office as a community to participate in on a more infrequent basis than I had originally envisioned.”This “unexpected rhythm is … stretching us to conceive of membership as something far broader than initially assumed. And a new dimension of discernment opens up for us around how we go about creating a cohesive community with far wider and more fluid edges than anticipated,” she said.Eventually, she hopes the model of being a cloister in and of the world will be replicable “in any denomination, any space.”“The way we think about monasteries is, they’re places you go away to,” she said. “You go to get your spirituality fix, but in the life of a monastic, the work and prayer is all integrated.”So, TDO is reclaiming the experience of the monastic, “milking cows and praying, writing your emails and you’re praying and, as we Episcopalians like to say, praying shapes believing.”We need places like The Divine Office to help us all to daily grow into discipleship, Cadigan added, quoting Giordano: “‘Jesus is our co-worker, sitting right beside us for every email, every phone call, every everything.’”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Dennis Doherty says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA June 15, 2018 at 9:59 pm Sure! Why not? An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN June 11, 2018 at 6:34 pm I find myself wondering how this delightful TDO concept might look within a ‘Seniors” or ‘Retirement’ community…something organic & not rigidly defined…? Dennis Doherty says: June 15, 2018 at 9:35 pm Thanks Susan.Keep an eye on our building social media.http://www.saint-augustine.orghttp://[email protected] [email protected] Facebook Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Dennis Doherty says: Peace. Prayer. Productivity: California ‘day monastery’ melds prayer, work ‘Jesus is our co-worker’ in experiment begun in Santa Monica Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ June 11, 2018 at 5:51 pm What a wonderful thing to see happening — thank you for sharing this news. Please keep us updated as The Divine Office evolves! Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Revd Sarah V.Lewis says: Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rosemary Taylor says: Evangelism, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 15, 2018 at 9:57 pm Sounds interesting! Dennis Doherty says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Dennis Doherty says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 12, 2018 at 8:05 am We have a very similar thing here in Cambridge, UK for students in a church that is no longer used for worship. They call it “the Scriptorium.” They have converted pews into workspaces and offer morning prayer and then 4 writing sessions of 90 minutes with breaks for tea and lunch. It has grown very quickly in the past 1.5 years and proved popular. The theological perspective is more conservative in nature (which shapes the lunch discussions which are moderated), but it is overall a theologically diverse group and open. I have sometimes worked there regularly on my own doctoral dissertation and found it useful. Lunch is free once a week and other days people bring lunch. I think it is a great model for collaborative work. https://www.christianheritage.org.uk/Groups/282343/Home/Scriptorium/Scriptorium.aspx. And I saw a Lutheran experimental church plant called St Lydia’s also has a co-working space (for which people do pay a subscription): http://stlydias.org/co-working/. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET June 15, 2018 at 9:53 pm Our next meeting day is Thursday June 21st. We begin with morning prayer at our chapel inside the church at 9am. That’s about 30 minutes. Check out our Church website at:http://www.saint-augustine.orgI recommend dropping a note to Review Katie at [email protected] for more info. June 15, 2018 at 9:33 pm Keep an eye on our social media. Our content is light as we’re building. Thanks!http://www.saint-augustine.orghttp://[email protected] [email protected] Facebook The Rev. Jennifer Adams-Massmann says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Susan M. Paynter says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Comments (10) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH June 11, 2018 at 7:41 pm Love this. I live in atlanta, but will be in LA next week. Would love to stop by. Would that be ok?last_img read more

On Peace Officers Memorial Day, we honor the responders of last…

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here OpinionBy Reggie Connell / Managing Editor of The Apopka VoiceFor generations, the officers of the Apopka Police Department have answered the call to serve and protect this community. They endure long shifts in dangerous and unpredictable circumstances, and they embody courage and honor.And nothing exemplifies that more than an incident that took place in Apopka over 70 years ago.In March of 1941, Fred Risener, the Chief of the Apopka Police Department, and a rookie officer walked into a gunfight with two robbers that left the rookie shot and killed. Eight months later, the Japanese military attacked Pearl Harbor, and America’s attention turned to World War II, and this incident was largely forgotten for decades.That rookie’s name was Denson Hudson.“Officer Hudson’s death occurred more than 76 years ago,” said Apopka Mayor Joe Kilsheimer in his keynote address at the memorial ceremony for Hudson. “The details are fuzzy. Memories may be hazy. Most of us did not know Denson Hudson, nor members of his family. But the reason we are here today is clear: We Honor public service in all its forms. Let us never forget the ultimate sacrifice made by Officer Denson Hudson, who was on duty that night seeking to protect the lives and property of Apopka residents. Seventy-six years ago, he was doing exactly what we ask of our police officers today.”The APD honored Hudson with a plaque that they will install at the APD building. Current Police Chief Michael McKinley explained its importance during his speech at the ceremony.“Today, we place this memorial here to honor Officer Hudson for making the ultimate sacrifice to this community and to be a constant reminder of the sacrifices our law enforcement officers make every day,” he said. “The brave officers we gather to remember on this day in May devoted themselves fully to others — to serve and to protect others — and in the process, they were willing to give their lives. Officer Hudson is remembered today and forever, as one of those officers. I pray that we never have to add another name to the wall or plaque to this building.”In his remarks during the ceremony, APD Captain Randall Fernandez hoped the plaque would remind officers of the legacy they are a part of.“Officers, new and old, passing through these doors, will remember the sacrifice of Officer Hudson and this plaque will serve as a reminder to not forget our past, and to have honor in our future.”In moments of danger and desperation, the first people we turn to are law enforcement officers. They are called first responders, but oftentimes they are the responders of last resort.When all else fails, we call 9-1-1.Minutes after the call, these brave officers show up despite the obvious potential for danger and solve critical issues sometimes involving life and death.They save lives, they stand in the gaps of peril, and they run into danger and violence. Let me write that again… they save lives, they stand in the gaps of peril, and they run INTO danger and violence.Since 1962, America remembers the sacrifice that fallen officers like Hudson have made on May 15th – Peace Officers Memorial Day.“The men and women in Law Enforcement continue to work hard every day to safeguard the communities they have sworn to protect,” said McKinley. “Often they are unappreciated for the hard work and long hours they put in to ensure we are safe. This day is set aside to remember all the law enforcement officers who gave their lives protecting their communities. The national memorial is now more than 300 feet long, and there are more than 20,000 officers’ names on the wall. This year, the names of 394 officers killed in the line of duty are being added to the wall. Of these 394 names, 143 were officers killed during 2016, and an additional 251 officers who died in previous years but whose stories of sacrifice had been lost to history until now will be added to the wall.”Kilsheimer prays that no other APD officer will be called upon to make that sacrifice.“The men and women of the Apopka Police Department have sworn an oath to protect the public, especially those who cannot protect themselves. The men and women of the Apopka Police Department have sworn an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States, the Laws of the State of Florida and the charter and ordinances of the City of Apopka. This is a solemn oath that no one can take lightly. And we cannot escape the fact – that given the very nature of their jobs – the men and women of the Apopka Police Department may encounter a situation in which the ultimate sacrifice will be made. It is a horrific thought. Every time, a police officer falls in some city across the country, I have the realization: What if that was Apopka? What would I do? What would I say? God forbid that should ever happen. And I pray for God’s Hand of Protection over our police officers. But that is also why we must say: Let us never forget.”It is also important to remember that these police officers are fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters and that they risk their lives and sacrifice precious time with loved ones so we can live in peace and security.  But more than that, they are often leaders in their communities, serving as mentors, coaches, friends, and neighbors – working each day tirelessly to ensure that the people they serve have the opportunities that should be afforded to all.   It takes a special kind of courage to be a law enforcement officer. Though they too often spend their days witnessing humanity at its worst, it is in their extraordinary examples that we see humanity at its best.On this day of remembrance, Fernandez also honored two fallen officers from the Orlando Police Department and the Orange County Sheriff’s Office. Two different agencies, but still one brotherhood.“We often don’t understand the reasons behind the circumstances we are in, but we should resolve they are part of a larger plan. You must understand the highest highs and the lowest lows in your life are yours and how you react to them builds your character and your faith. The memories of Orlando Lieutenant Debra Clayton and (Orange County) Deputy Sheriff Norman Lewis remind us of the challenges and dangers we face every day. We in this brotherhood of blue, often say we will never forget, we must bring honor to those words and make them words of action. Today we recognize Denson Hudson, a man almost none of us in this crowd knew. He gave his life for this community in 1941, well before I was born. But as I am here with you, and we can say, and we can show, the Apopka Police Department, will indeed, always remember.” Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Previous articleCongresswoman Demings visits with overseas troopsNext articleCookies and milk with a cop coming Saturday Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

easyJet launches on-board collections for Anthony Nolan Trust

Tagged with: Celebrity corporate AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. easyJet launches on-board collections for Anthony Nolan Trust This is the second year of easyJet’s charity partnership with The Anthony Nolan Trust.Rugby player Richard Hill said at the launch: “The Anthony Nolan Trust is a charity that is close to my heart. I chose to support the charity financially with proceeds from my a year of fundraising in 2006.”EasyJet on-board collections will take place on all flights during August and September. A proportion of the money raised will be shared by The Anthony Nolan Trust with itssister registers in the European countries that easyJet flies to. Howard Lake | 3 August 2007 | News  27 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Saracens and England Rugby player, Richard Hill, has launched easyJet’s in-flight collection campaign for The Anthony Nolan Trust. Throughout the summer, easyJet cabin crew will ask passengers to donate any loose change to support the charity.EasyJet collections allow passengers from flights across Europe to donate money. Last year’s collections raised over £500,000. The partnership with easyJet will also enable The Anthony Nolan Trust to recruit thousands of urgently needed individuals to bone marrow registers across Europe. Advertisement read more

Over 100 local charities apply to be Thames Valley law firm’s charity of the year

first_imgOver 100 local charities apply to be Thames Valley law firm’s charity of the year  167 total views,  3 views today Advertisement Tagged with: charity of the year corporate small charities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 Howard Lake | 22 March 2018 | News Other fundraisingThe firm also continues to support a wide range of charitable events, including the Reading Santa Race, the Reading Legal Walk and the Reading Pancake Race, which the firm won in February this year. Thames Valley solicitors firm Blandy & Blandy LLP has been “overwhelmed” by the response from local charities seeking its support.Over 100 charities have applied to be one of the two charities that the firm will partner with for a two year period, starting in July 2018. Applications are now closed.The company’s current charity partners are Reading Samaritans and Twyford-based Daisy’s Dream. By the end of the current partnership the company will have donated over £35,000 to the two charities since 2016.In previous years it has supported causes including Thames Valley Air Ambulance, Berkshire Vision, Camp Mohawk and Younger People with Dementia.Marketing Manager David Lamont, chair of the firm’s corporate social responsibility committee, said: “The overwhelming response we have received further highlights the growing need local charities have for support from businesses… Blandy & Blandy is proud to support local charities and events, through fundraising, sponsorship, volunteering and other means.”A campaign was launched last autumn to encourage local charities to apply, with over 100 charities having now contacted the firm.Staff at the firm will vote on the list in April to select the two charity partners.  168 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Grant funding can exclude those it is designed to help, finds charity

first_img About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Tagged with: Funding research Melanie May | 24 February 2021 | News  147 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Grant funding can exclude those it is designed to help, finds charity A report from Sported has found that a lack of recognition of the common characteristics of many community groups, and an over-simplification of terms to define the disadvantaged, means many are being excluded from accessing grants vital for future survival.Sported questioned members of its network of community sport, and youth groups across the UK and found that many groups that are good at meeting the specific needs of the marginalised people they work, have common characteristics. However, these same characteristics mean they are disadvantaged when it comes to applying for funds.The report found that those driven by local need, informed by lived experience, and deeply rooted in their community have had little need for an online presence, and their networks may be restricted. Leaders may also have English as a second language, which may make filling in online, written forms more challenging. And, being led by volunteers, and often one or two key people, means they have limited resources and aren’t able to commit the necessary time to write applications.According to Sported’s report, very small or frugal groups have not needed detailed financial management systems, meaning the information available for funders is limited. If they have been very frugal in the past and have not sought grants, it can be a disadvantage because they are not known by the funders, and some funders want to see groups with reserves and a certain future, while those most in need are likely to have very limited reserves.The report also highlights that the marginalised groups funds often focus on are broad and diverse, but the terminology used to define them can be limiting, such as those who are ‘less well-off’ or ‘BAME’. Other groups such as carers, young parents and single parents are not covered by this broad-brush approach to disadvantage. Furthermore, the BAME grouping does not consider the very different reasons each of the many different ethnicities and cultures, who fall into this grouping, may have for low participation rates in sport and physical activity.Sported’s recommendations include that funders:Assess groups based on what they can deliver and with what resources, rather than how well they can write about need and outcomesHelp groups to ‘decode’ application forms with clear explanations of terminologyMake application form guidance also available via videoMake funds exclusionary and set parametersFund professional support alongside grants, so that groups can improve their application skillsNicola Walker, Sported Chief Executive said:“This report demonstrates the need for funders to work through local knowledge, rather than high level targets in order to meet the urgent financial need among some of the small and ‘hard-to-reach’ groups. Covid-19 has thrown up many problems and barriers that community groups just didn’t face two years ago. For community groups to survive and to deal with the issues they now face, it is vital that financial support is channeled to those groups who most need it, many of whom have never sought grant funding before.” Advertisementlast_img read more

New Tool to Help fight Weedy Soybean Fields

first_img New Tool to Help fight Weedy Soybean FieldsDaniel Waldstein,In 2016, weedy soybean fields were common across Indiana as spring rains kept growers from getting their pre-emergence programs started. BASF has a new product that will allow soybean growers to get their burndown and pre-emergence program going with one product. Daniel Waldstein, Technical Market Manager with BASF, told HAT Zidua PRO is a new pre-emergence herbicide that allows growers to start clean and stay clean, “It provides burndown and long lasting residual action in one jug.”  He said it can be applied on most soil types right up to planting adding additional flexibility.  It has a low use rate of only 6oz per acre, so it reduces handling issues.To help manage weed resistance, the new product offers multiple modes of action, “Zidua PRO has 3 sights of action which gives us built in resistance management. As a contact burndown and residual pre-emergent, Zidua PRO herbicide helps growers keep fields clean from contact to canopy.” The product helps provide residual control up to 14 days longer than competitive group 15 herbicides when applied at full rate. Longer residual control means more time to make post-emergent applications, helping growers spray when weeds are less than four inches tall.Waldstein says Zidua PRO is especially effective on hard to control weeds. “The pre-emergent residual component of Zidua PRO herbicide provides an effective starting point for season-long control of weeds like Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, and marestail,” said Waldstein. “Following up post-emergence with the optimum program, which includes Engenia herbicide after registration, will bring total sites of action up to five. This will help sustain these new chemistries for future generations.” It is a solution for any soybean system as it works with Roundup Ready®, LibertyLink®, Non-GMO, and Roundup Ready 2 Xtend®, and in conventional tillage, no-till and reduced-till systems.For more details, see your BASF retailer or representative. Facebook Twitter Previous articleCropLife America Supports Reducing Regulatory Burdens ActNext articleSoybean and Wheat Futures Affected by February Report Gary Truitt SHARE New Tool to Help fight Weedy Soybean Fields Home Indiana Agriculture News New Tool to Help fight Weedy Soybean Fields Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Feb 9, 2017 SHARElast_img read more

How Could Tax Reform Hurt the Housing Market?

first_img Joey Pizzolato is the Online Editor of DS News and MReport. He is a graduate of Spalding University, where he holds a holds an MFA in Writing as well as DePaul University, where he received a B.A. in English. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in a variety of print and online journals and magazines. To contact Pizzolato, email [email protected] How Could Tax Reform Hurt the Housing Market? The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Tax reform is one of the major ticket items on the current administration’s agenda, a measure that Congress hopes to tackle now that they are back from summer recess. When President Donald Trump first announced his modified tax plan—the first comprehensive change in 30 years—one of the main amendments was the elimination of itemized tax deductions, which would be replaced by doubling the standard deduction.However, two subgroups in the housing industry that would stand to lose on this change rather than benefit: real estate agents, and residential builders.Real estate agents could see a trickle-down effect if the tax incentives for homeownership is weakened, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR) Tax Reform August Recess Talking Points. They hold the opinion that limited itemized deductions will not entice enough homeowners to enter the housing market when inventory is short and prices continue to rise. Further, “Homeowners already pay 83 percent of all federal income taxes, and this share would go even higher under similar reform proposals. Homeowners should not have to pay a higher share of taxes because of tax reform.”Residential builders could also be affected by changes to the tax code, according to the National Association of Home Builders, who also agree that doubling the standard deduction would have adverse effects on the mortgage interest deduction, even if it remains intact, and ultimately, “reduce housing demand and lead to lower home values.” Both organizations agree on the fact that tax reform is long overdue, but it cannot be at the expense of homeownership or the housing industry.Secretary of Treasury Steve Mnuchin has said both he and the president would like to have a draft of tax reform before 2017 comes to a close. September 5, 2017 2,699 Views Tagged with: NAHB NAR Tax Reform NAHB NAR Tax Reform 2017-09-05 Joey Pizzolato About Author: Joey Pizzolato Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Headlines, Market Studies, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / How Could Tax Reform Hurt the Housing Market? Previous: Cordray Skirts the Question Next: Harvey Survivors: HUD’s Top Priority  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

New car registrations in Donegal down 10.35%

first_img Pinterest Facebook Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Pinterest WhatsApp New car registrations in Donegal down 10.35% News WhatsApp Google+center_img Previous articleDownings retain All Ireland crown: Allen Pasoma ReactionNext articleDiversions in place following Dunkineely crash News Highland By News Highland – June 4, 2019 Facebook Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter New car registrations in Donegal are down 10.35%.According to latest figures from the Society of the Irish Motor Industry, 1629 new cars have been registered in the county this year to date, down from 1817 the previous year.Nationally new car registrations last month are up 4.7% compared to May 2018 but down 7.6% this year to date, compared to the same period last year.Brian Cooke, SIMI Director General says; sales overall year to date have been disappointing with both business and consumer Brexit related uncertainty contributing to dampened demand for new vehicles. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennanlast_img read more

Frosses Road Junction with N56 to close for road works

first_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 To Facilitate the ongoing road improvement works on the Inver Road Scheme, a Road Closure at the Frosses Road Junction with the N56 is coming into effect from tomorrow, Monday 9th November until Friday 11th of December.Diversion will be in place and motorists are advised to allow extra time for travelling.Road to be closed:R262- Frosses  Road at its junction with the N56Alternative Route :All normal traffic should be diverted to the Ardaghey – Ardara Road (Diversion route 1) via: N56, LP2863, LP2923, and LP1515.Larger HGV Traffic shall be diverted to the Ardara-Killybegs road N56 (Diversion route 2).Local diversion routes can also be used (i.e. the Cranny Road – LP1625, and the Frosses – Drimarone – Ballydevitt road – LP1685 & LP1845) however these diversions are for local light traffic only.Motorists are advised to use Diversion Route 2 via the N56 during periods of snow and frost while the diversion is in place as this route is gritted as part of the Winter Maintenance programme. Google+ Facebook Facebook By News Highland – November 8, 2020 WhatsApp Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Homepage BannerNews Twitter Google+center_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp Frosses Road Junction with N56 to close for road works RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleMan arrested following house search in MullaghduffNext articleWe must think carefully about how to manage Christmas – O’Connor News Highland Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

80,000 homeless families every year

first_imgThe Labour MP John Healey has warned that 80,000 families will be ‘on the verge of homelessness every year’ if Theresa May does not reverse cuts to housing benefit and support for those already homeless.The Labour MP  (former Shadow Secretary for Housing) has published analysis which shows cuts to housing benefit, local authority support and a loss of 143,000 of council houses would result in tens of thousands more people becoming homeless.The number of those classed as homeless has risen by 6.3 per cent every year since 2010 and, if the rate is maintained then this would result in 80,000 homeless families by 2020 – which would include 60,000 families with children. The latest figures also show the number of people sleeping on England’s streets has doubled since 2010.“The Conservatives’ record on housing is six years of failure, and in no area is this more painfully clear than homelessness,” Healey (left) said,“We should all be ashamed that in one of the richest countries in the world there has been such a huge increase in the number of people who are homeless over the last six years.“These figures are a stark warning for Theresa May not to continue with the same decisions on housing and social security that have failed so badly over the last six years.“Top of her in-tray must be exempting homelessness hostels and other specialist accommodation from the planned £1bn of cuts that is set to close vital services across the country.“I first urged Ministers to exempt specialist homes from these cuts back in December, but they have not listened so far.However, on the same day, Homelessness Reduction Bill was published by the Communities and Local Government Select Committee.The Bill, as tabled by Conservative MP Bob Blackman, includes measures to help councils intervene earlier to prevent people from becoming homeless.The Bill amends the Housing Act 1996 to expand councils’ duties to reduce homelessness by providing that eviction notices are proof that an applicant is threatened with homelessness and by doubling the definition of ‘threatened with homelessness’ from 28 to 56 days.The Communities and Local Government Select Committee will now undertake a pre-legislative inquiry to examine whether the Bill will achieve its aims of reducing levels of homelessness.Richard Lambert, Chief Executive Officer at the National Landlords Association (NLA), said:“When faced with eviction, many tenants are advised by councils to remain in a property until forcibly evicted by bailiffs, thus making them homeless and eligible for social housing.“The NLA has consistently warned that putting vulnerable households in this position puts an unnecessary strain on tenants, landlords, and the Courts Service. As a result, landlords may become less likely to let property to those most in need.“By ensuring that councils accept eviction notices as evidence of homelessness, this Bill will take the strain off of overstretched courts, ensure that tenants are properly supported by their local councils, and provide landlords with the confidence they need to let their property out to more vulnerable tenants.”Homelessness Reduction Bill homeless families homelessness John Healey housing benefit Theresa May September 4, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » 80,000 homeless families every year previous nextRegulation & Law80,000 homeless families every yearLabour MP calls for more action as a new Homelessness Reduction Bill is published.The Negotiator4th September 20160711 Viewslast_img read more