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Would TCU Have Given Oregon A Better Game

The first College Football Playoff game ever played, Thursday’s Rose Bowl between the Oregon Ducks against the Florida State Seminoles, promised to be a classic featuring two Heisman Trophy winning quarterbacks. Instead, it was a one-sided romp that saw Oregon outscore Florida State 41-7 in the second half en route to a 39-point victory.Plenty of observers enjoyed the schadenfreude of seeing Seminoles quarterback Jameis Winston lose his first game as a college starter, particularly in light of Winston’s off-field comportment. But the blowout loss also amplified questions about whether Florida State should have been granted a playoff berth in the first place.Going into the playoff, there wasn’t much debate over the selection committee‘s top two teams, Alabama and Oregon, but there was plenty of controversy surrounding the admittance of Florida State and Ohio State over TCU and Baylor. In addition to the strange leapfrog Florida State and Ohio State made over TCU in the final edition of the committee’s rankings, a number of oddsmakers suggested both jilted Texas schools would be favored at a neutral field over either the Seminoles or Buckeyes.Some of that second-guessing looks silly after Ohio State beat Alabama in Thursday’s Sugar Bowl, earning a trip to face Oregon in the CFP’s championship game, hours after Baylor blew a 20-point 4th quarter lead against Michigan State to lose the Cotton Bowl. But in conjunction with TCU’s 39-point obliteration of Ole Miss (who placed ninth in the committee’s final rankings) in the Peach Bowl on Wednesday, Florida State’s humiliating loss to Oregon has, predictably, led to calls that TCU should have been in the playoff instead.Statistically, there’s something to that criticism. Going into the bowls, Florida State ranked tenth in ESPN’s Football Power Index (FPI) rating, which emphasizes per-drive scoring margin and downplays the theory that a team could have a knack for consistently winning close games, rather than just getting lucky. The Seminoles had been 13-0 before their meeting with Oregon, but the Seminoles’ point differential suggested they deserved a record more like 10-3 or even 9-4. The Seminoles’ year of living dangerously finally caught up with them.By contrast, TCU had ranked fifth in the FPI before the bowls, and currently sits at No. 4 behind Oregon, Alabama (who still rank second despite their loss), and Ohio State. Knowing what we know now, and using the historical distribution of actual point margins for a given prediction (based on an FPI-like Elo variant for seasons since the start of the BCS era), there’s a 98.2 percent probability that TCU’s point differential versus Oregon would have been closer than Florida State’s margin of defeat Thursday, and a 54 percent chance that TCU would cover the point spread if they were made a touchdown underdog against the Ducks.Then again, based on the pregame FPI ratings, Oregon’s 39-point win in the Rose Bowl also represented the 98th percentile of all possible outcomes for a game against Florida State at a neutral site. If they were to play again today, FPI’s current data says there’s a 96.6 percent probability the Seminoles would put forth a better showing the second time around.Hindsight is 20/20. So while it’s likely that TCU was, and is, a better team than Florida State, it was difficult at the time to argue for an undefeated Power 5 conference team to be left out of the playoff field, even if their record was out of step with their point differential.And even now, the gulf between the two teams isn’t as wide as it seems after TCU had a 99th percentile performance in the Peach Bowl and Florida State had a 2nd percentile performance in the Rose Bowl. FPI says TCU would be favored by about 4.5 points on a neutral field, meaning there’d still be roughly a 39 percent chance of a Florida State victory even after accounting for the events of the past few days. read more

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Mon Laferte Talks First Coachella Performance Norma More

first_img Mon Laferte Talks First Coachella Performance mon-laferte-talks-first-coachella-performance-norma-more Email News Facebook Twitter The Latin GRAMMY-winning singer-songwriter touches on her first-ever Coachella performance, her diverse range of influences, and why storytelling is the most important part of her artistryAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Apr 13, 2019 – 9:30 am Chilean Latin GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Mon Laferte’s music is hard to categorize, but that’s precisely what makes it so enjoyable. Her latest album, 2018’s Norma, explores lots of an eclectic mix of sounds, textures and moods, all of which she brought to her Friday set at Coachella.Performing songs like “Tormento,” “Mi buen amor,” and “Amárrame,” Mon Laferte—born Norma Monserrat Bustamante Laferte—also did a cover of Dua Lipa’s “New Rules” during her set.The Recording Academy caught up with the singer after her performance, where she revealed what it felt like to play the renowned Indio fest for the very first time. What did it feel like to share your music for the first time at Coachella?I was very nervous at the beginning. It’s my first time at Coachella. But once I got onstage, I felt relaxed, I felt happy, and it was like, “Wow! I’m at Coachella!” A lot of people were really excited to see a more diverse lineup at Coachella this year, especially in Latin music. How does it feel to be a part of that?It’s very excting, it’s a moment where you feel that locally we’re much more open to different genres, and to be part of that moment, when there’s something better and more exciting coming.What’s been your favorite part of the festival so far? Have you seen any fellow performers?I haven’t seen many artists because since I’ve gotten offstage I’ve been doing promo and interviews back-to-back. But I do want to catch a couple of performances, and so far the experience has just been very beautiful. It’s a beautiful festival, the backstage, the ambiance. What you breathe and what you feel—it’s amazing. Lots of flowers. Can you tell us more about your most recent album—your sixth album!—Norma?So, Norma is an album created conceptually as the storytelling of 10 chapters of a relationship—in songs. [I wanted to bring in] my roots, not only where I come from, but more Pan-regional sounds—so you have mambo, you have salsa, you have many other genres. Who are your musical influences?I have a very diverse range of influences that goes all the way from singers like Janis Joplin, but it also goes to other genres. I was very influenced by salsa and very strong female [performers], like Billie Holiday.What’s the message you want to share with your music, both at home in Chile, in the U.S., and in the world at large?So essentially, I am a storyteller. And I like to tell stories. Music and the beat are very important, but more important is telling that story. Through my music, I open different spaces, spaces that, especially in festivals like this one, you open the window to experiencing a lot of other genres. Not only what’s trending—maybe urban, maybe reggaeton—but also many other things that are happening within the Latin world. Festivals are now revisiting both their genre diversity and gender diversity in their lineups. As a woman in music, what are some ways you feel women can best support each other in the industry and in the community?So in my case, it’s a lot of creating awareness and visibility and bringing this awareness and visibility towards parity. Towards being able to balance out the amount of females that are working both onstage and offstage within the industry and making sure that people have that consciousness. Maybe in festivals like Coachella you see a lot more balance, but in Latin America, we’re still far away from that. Just with the possibility of being able just, you know, to be here, performing on the main stage you’re already creating that space for many other women to come and do the same thing. The Woman. Collective Wants Music Festivals To Be A Safe Space For “Every One”Read more Mon Laferte Talks First Coachella Performance, ‘Norma’ & More last_img read more

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Jupiter stares back in ravishing Hubble portrait

first_img Jupiter looking good Share your voice Hubble snapped this view of Jupiter on June 27. NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) and M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley) Jupiter is always a stunner. The streaky gas giant with its scenic swirls just posed for a fresh Hubble Space Telescope portrait. It looks as lovely and wild as ever. On Thursday, NASA shared the new Jupiter image, which was taken June 27.   Tags The Great Red Spot is the star of the show. It’s a massive, mysterious storm that’s been raging for hundreds of years. It has changed shape over time and currently bears a resemblance to a red eye. Colorful bands of clouds move around the Great Red Spot. These bands are kept separated by tremendous winds that can hit 400 miles (644 kilometers) per hour.NASA also shared a cool video showing Jupiter’s rotation as assembled from Hubble images.  13 Photos NASA brings our attention to the orange band near the planet’s middle. “The bright orange color may be a sign that deeper clouds are starting to clear out, emphasizing red particles in the overlying haze,” the space agency said.The Juno spacecraft is currently checking out Jupiter from orbit, giving us a closer look at the planet’s active, stormy atmosphere. Hubble’s view is from farther away, but both NASA missions contribute to an understanding of how Jupiter works. Hubble, which is a joint project of NASA and the European Space Agency, takes regular looks at Jupiter in order to track changes in its colors and storms. NASA said this year’s portrait shows a “more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.” It’s a beauty. Sci-Tech Comments NASA view of Jupiter looks like an infamous South Park character Dang, NASA, this Jupiter portrait is gorgeous Jaw-dropping Jupiter: NASA’s Juno mission eyes the gas giant 3 NASA Spacelast_img read more

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