Category:

Society failing to address HIV/AIDS stigma – US activist

first_imgboth the legal and social environments are still failing to address stigma and discrimination against those most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS and people living with the disease.This is according to Stephanie Joseph-De Goes, Guyana’s Country Coordinator for the President’s EmergencyStephanie Joseph-De Goes delivering her remarks at Guyana’s seventh Annual AIDS Candlelight MemorialPlan For AIDS Relief – PEPFAR, a US governmental initiative to address the global HIV epidemic with her office based at the US Embassy in Georgetown.She made those remarks at Guyana’s seventh Annual AIDS Candlelight Memorial held at the Catholic Life Centre by the Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination (SASOD) on Sunday last, where a charge was made to all Guyanese to come together to fight against the stigma and discrimination for those living and infected by HIV/AIDS.“We must put an end to the disease of stigma and discrimination,” she stressed.During the event, the US diplomat remarked that in this 50th year of Guyana’s Independence, the country can truly make history by amending the Prevention of Discrimination Act 1997 to include sexual orientation, gender identity and health status, and repealing other laws that perpetuate stigma and discrimination.“Stigma and discrimination eats at the soul of a society. We know that eliminating stigma and discrimination will positively affect a nation’s progress, well-being, and public health for things like HIV prevention, care and treatment.”The US activist continued, “I ask you what is holding us back from zero discrimination. From ensuring human rights, equal rights for all no matter a person’s health status, gender identify or sexual orientation. When it comes down to it, I think it’s our personal judgments about difference.”She lamented that too often individuals use belief, religion, culture, etc, to judge others on differences: be it one’s skin colour, sexual identity, or health status. “Whatever the difference might be that does not fit into our worldview. Then we focus so much on those perceived differences that we forget our ‘sameness’. We forget what unites us – our ‘humanness,’” she pleaded.Joseph-De Goes posited that it was hard to get to zero discrimination because society and those in policymaking positions were so busy judging the differences instead of recognising the strengths in individual identities.“How can we deny human rights, compassion and love?” she questioned.According to the US diplomat, “we cannot afford to say we cannot support amending the Prevention of Discrimination Act because of religion, beliefs, culture, etc”.“We know what has been done in the name of belief – human atrocities and ‘man’s inhumanity to man. Will we continue to allow injustices in the name of belief and ‘difference’?”She charged Guyanese society to work together for equality and to recognise that denying any one of us the right to justice, equity, access, security, education, health and employment – human rights – is denying all of us.“Let us decide to work together towards a Guyana where laws protect the human rights and the dignity of all. Guyana’s time is now. We are at the 50-year mark. Let us join forces to support the amendment of not just the 1997 Prevention of Discrimination Act but also all other punitive laws,” Joseph-De Goes said.She expressed hope that in the next 50 years, Guyana can be a nation with zero discrimination and 100 per cent human rights so that every person whether HIV-positive, HIV-negative, heterosexual, homosexual or bisexual, lives in dignity with the rights to employment, health, safety and security.last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

GPSU to consider Govt’s “differentiated approach”

first_imgDay one of talks between the Guyana Public Service Union (GPSU) and Government on public servants’ wages and salaries for 2016 culminated with the Union agreeing to look at the State’s proposal to replace the ‘across-the-board’ increase.According to a joint statement late Wednesday, following discussions, the two parties entered into the agreement.“GPSU agrees to explore the Government’s proposal for the differentiated approach to replace the across-the-board percentage increase,” the release stated.Minister of State Joseph HarmonGPSU President Patrick YardeThe parties also agreed that the negotiations were conducted in the spirit and obligations of’ the Memorandum of Agreement between the GPSU and the Public Service Ministry for the avoidance and settlement of disputes.The bargaining unit is to consist of persons employed under the Department of the Public Service (DPS) and Public Service Commission (PSC) including those on contract, the statement detailed, while adding that an agreement was made for a committee to be initiated, to make recommendations to the negotiating team on allowances for public servants as soon as possible.The negotiating team is scheduled to meet again on June 27.On the other hand, while talks were ongoing, Minister of State Joseph Harmon sought to respond to complaints by the Union that Government omitted allowance negotiations from the discussions, that his Administration preferred a sequential process when engaging in these discussions.Speaking at the post-Cabinet press briefing on Wednesday, the Minister said the letter from the Union was received after the conclusion of the Cabinet meeting; however, he noted that the Government after 20 years of holding these negotiations has to use a sequential process.“We have indicated to the Union upon receipt of the letter which voiced their concerns and we have made known to them that we prefer a sequential process when engaging in these negotiations. We would not lump wages and salaries with allowances, our preference is to take it consecutively”.The Minister of State disclosed that the Government wrote the Union explaining that they have no intention of omitting allowances.“We did say that for over 20 years that allowances hadn’t been touched and therefore we could not now in our first year in Government say that we are not going to touch allowances, so we did communicate to the Union that wages, salaries and allowances will be dealt with but we prefer to deal with them one after the other”.The GPSU on Tuesday in accepting an invitation from the Ministry of the Presidency to commence negations on public servants wages and salaries noted that they want discussions on allowances to be included on the agenda.GPSU President Patrick Yarde had said that the invitation omitted negotiations on allowance, which the Union will not stand for.Minister Harmon stated that the Union’s comments were however expected.“I must say that I am not surprised that the Union has started off that way because usually that is how unions operate but we know that the atmosphere in which these negotiations take place, it is a friendly atmosphere where there is no antagonism between the Public Service Union and the Government side and therefore, both sides will negotiate and negotiate hard,” Harmon remarked.He noted that Government was optimistic about the negotiations. Wage, salary talkslast_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

Guyana introduces bivalent oral vaccine

first_imgGuyana has been listed among the 36 countries of the Region of the Americas to have switched from oral polio vaccine (tOPV), containing types 1, 2 and 3 polioviruses, to the bivalent oral vaccine (bOPV), containing only types 1 and 3.The decision for the switch in vaccine was made through the Pan American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO) in June 2015 and all 36 countries successfully switched within the established timeframe, between April 17 and May 1, 2016.There are three serotypes of polioviruses, each of which can cause paralytic poliomyelitis. The Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has been used globally by WHO in the eradication effort, is a trivalent vaccine that contains all three serotypes.In September 2015, WHO declared that wild poliovirus type 2 has been eradicated from the planet – no cases caused by this serotype had been detected since November 1999.However in 2015, there were nine cases of poliomyelitis caused by the type 2 vaccine. For these reasons WHO decided to remove the type 2 Sabin strain from OPV, and switch from trivalent to bivalent vaccine in April 2016.Guyana has had success with its Immunisation Programme over the last decade.This has come about with the strategies used to combat preventable diseases in children.Measles, mumps and Rubella vaccines was introduced in 1995, in 1998 – Hepatitis B to health workers and other high risk groups, in 1999 – Yellow Fever, in 2000 and 2001- Pentavalent vaccines, in 2010 – Rotavirus, in 2011 Pneumococcal vaccines.The Human Papilloma Virus Vaccines was introduced in 2011. This vaccine works as a prevention measure to fight cervical cancer and is being administered to young girls, 9-13 years of age.Active surveillance is maintained for poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, and rubella, tetanus including neonatal and adult, diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis), tuberculosis and yellow fever and all other diseases.We are constantly monitoring the signs and symptoms of any vaccine preventable disease. Testing and confirmation for these vaccine preventable diseases is also being done in collaboration with PAHO/WHO.Towards this end, there has been significant achievement in the EPI programme in Guyana. Guyana has maintained a polio free status since 1991, no reported cases of Measles and the last case of yellow fever was in 1968.Vaccination coverage has always been maintained at over 90 per cent in the antigens under one year of age over the last five years at the national level.This illustrates the government’s commitment to ensure that children are protected against the vulnerable diseases and reduce childhood mortality.last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

EBOLA

first_imgShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

Posted On :
Category:

13 Guilty of Mercenary Charge

first_imgAfter hours of deliberations, the jury of Criminal Court ‘D’ on Tuesday, June 10, handed down a unanimous guilty verdict against 13 men charged with Mercenarism.In their unanimous guilty verdict, the jurors established that prosecution’s evidence was overwhelming to pronounce a guilty verdict against the defendants.They are expected to be sentenced to prison on June 17 by Judge Emery Paye of Criminal Court ‘D.’Minutes after the verdict was handed down, the grounds of the Temple of Justice turned into scene of mourning. People believed to be family members and sympathizers of the defendants bitterly crying.A woman believed to be a family member of one of the guilty party suddenly fainted and fell, claiming the attention of other relatives who quickly moved in with cold water to pour on her.Some of them were heard saying, “There is no justice in this country. We are going to use every available means for our people to gain their freedom.”The angry crowd almost physically attacked the jurors outside the court.The group tried to block the entrance of the courtroom; but their plan did not materialize owing to the intervention of officers of the Police Support Unit (PSU) of the Liberia National Police (LNP) and their UNMIL counterparts. The heavily armed officers quickly barricaded the entire perimeter of the Temple of Justice. The officers deployed at the Court made every effort to prevent people from entering the courtroom. That situation almost resulted into chaos but was quickly brought under control through the intervention of some lawyers and court staffers.Case Summary The men were tried under Liberia’s 1976 law against “mercenarism,” which carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.They are expected to be sentenced to prison on June 17 by Judge Emery Paye of Criminal Court ‘D.’Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) The defendants were indicted in 2011 for allegedly carrying out cross border raid in neighboring Côte d’Ivoire where several people, including seven United Nations peacekeepers, were killed.In the indictment, government alleged that the defendants were trained in the Thai Forest in Grand Gedeh County, where they launched a crossed border attack into Côte d’Ivoire.Defendants denied the allegation, thereby shifting the burden of proof on the prosecution. The trial began in earnest on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, with eighteen Liberians accused of taking part in a cross-border raid in neighboring Côte d’Ivoire appearing briefly under tight security in Criminal Court ‘D’.At that hearing, the handcuffed men in the docket pleaded not guilty for the second time to the charge when it was read to them in open court by the clerk of court. The men had first appeared in February, but the case was postponed for one month after they stormed the courtroom, destroying property and behaving violently to express their dissatisfaction over the slow pace of the case.Shortly after the case was first heard, it was suspended by Judge Yussif Kaba on claims of juror bribery. The trial was then postponed to Thursday, March 13, by Judge Emery Paye.During the four-month trial, prosecution produced 11 witnesses with seven rebuttal witnesses, while the defense team paraded 13 witnesses with 3 rebuttal witnesses.On Friday, May 9, Criminal Court “D” at the Temple of Justice released five of the 18, having established the fact that of government’s 11 witnesses who had testified throughout the proceedings, none mentioned their names or linked any of them to the crime.In that ruling, Judge Emery Paye praised the prosecution team for showing “a mark of professionalism,” after lawyers for the State admitted failure to establish the connection of the five to the commission of the crime of mercenarism in that neighboring republic.Delivering the Court’s decision on the plea, Judge Emery Paye declared that “defendants Timothy Barlee, Fred Chelly, Christopher Larkpeh, Junior Gelor and Emmanuel Pewee’s, plea is hereby granted.” Two other defendants’, whose names had also not been mentioned by witnesses, were submitted for release by the defense; but Judge Paye denied their request since they had already voluntarily confessed to the crime.BackgroundIt is alleged that the men joined Ivorian fighters, who attacked villages in Côte d’Ivoire, killing civilians, destroying homes and displacing thousands between 2010 and 2011.They were also accused of being responsible for the deaths of seven Nigerian United Nations peacekeepers in the Southeastern part of that country. State prosecutors said evidence in their possession included arms and ammunition along with audio and video footage of meetings attended by the accused.The crisis in Côte d’Ivoire erupted after the former President, Laurent Gbagbo, refused to leave office after losing the 2010 presidential and general elections to current leader Alassane Ouattara.Tens-of-thousands Ivorian refugees fled into Liberia, as did an unknown number of combatants.   The Liberian authorities have described the accused as “the lowest of human characteristics in volunteering to kill, destroy and commit criminal acts in exchange for adequate payment”.last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

UK Ahmadiyya Muslim Association Donates 10,000 British Pounds to Fight Ebola in Liberia

first_imgThe Ahmadiyya Muslim Association in the United Kingdom has donated two checks totaling ten thousand British Pounds (£10,000.00) to assist the Liberian Government in its  fight against the spread of the deadly EBOLA virus in Liberia.The money is intended to purchase essential medical supplies and protective gears for medical practitioners who have dedicated their time and efforts in the fight against the Ebola virus.Making the presentation at a special ceremony in London over the weekend, the national president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association in the United Kingdom, Rafiq Hayat   noted that the health situation in Liberia is of grave concern to his association, especially at a time when the country is undertaking a massive rebuilding process.According to a dispatch from Minister Counselor Anthony K. Selmah of the Liberian Embassy’s Public Affairs section in London, Mr, Hayat said the amount is his association’s initial contribution and efforts  being made to galvanize more support from other Ahmadiyya communities.The checks were presented to Ambassador Rudolf von Ballmoos, who subsequently turned them over to a representative of the Liberia Medical and Dental Association in the United Kingdom, Dr. Kokulo Waiwaiku, and the president of the Union of Liberian Organizations in the United Kingdom, Prince Taylor.The associations have already commenced the purchase of intended medical supplies which will soon be airlifted to Liberia.The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community currently operates an 11-bedroom  health center in Tubmanburg, Bomi County, which was constructed in 2007 at the cost of $US70, 000.00 to buttress government’s health care delivery system. The clinic was dedicated by Vice President Joseph N. Boakai.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

Chief Justice Lewis One of Liberia’s Greatest Minds of the Century

first_imgAssociate Justice Philip A.Z. Banks of the Supreme Court,  delivering the eulogy on behalf of the Liberian Judiciary at the funeral service yesterday of former Chief Justice Johnnie N. Lewis, described him as “ one of the  land’s greatest minds of the century.” The funeral service held at the Centennial Memorial Pavilion in Monrovia was attended by an array of dignitaries and people of all walks of life led by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.Associate Justice Banks in his tribute described Chief Justice Lewis as a man who had great passion and love for the law and wanted everybody to be accorded due process and justice.“He was a brilliant man who loved the law,” said Justice Banks.  The virtues that mattered most to the Supreme Court were his knowledge of the law, his commitment to the law and his achievement of justice.“We heard of his achievements and the brilliant work we know that he did. That was because of his love for the law,” Justice Banks emphasized.“When he criticized the manner in which people were practicing the law that was because of his love for it.”“It is because of the love he had for the law that made him as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court to challenge the manner in which the former Speaker of the House of Representatives and electoral District# 6 of Montserrado County, Rep. Edwin Snowe, was removed from that position by his colleagues in the 52nd National Legislature.”“It was also based on his love of the law that the Supreme Court decided to invalidate the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC),” adding “It was not because there was no substantive merit in it, but it lacked the core elements of the fundamentals of the law, which provide that a person should be presumed innocent unless they have gone through the due process of law and they should not be condemned.” “It was his love of the law that caused him to ensure that the judiciary worked independently of the other two branches of government,” Associate Justice Banks declared.“It was because of his love for the law that made him to walk from his fourth floor office at the Temple of Justice to courtrooms to make sure that cases were heard and justice was carried out.” Justice Banks said he was honored to eulogize Chief Justice Lewis as Cllr. Johnnie Lewis, professor, judge and chief justice.  “He was my friend, a longtime mentor, and a mentor and friend to many of you.”Reflecting on his long and close association with the deceased, Justice Banks recalled that they were students at the Louis Arthur Grimes Law School, at the University of Liberia.  They also held a partnership, the Banks and Lewis Law Firm.“We both worked during the interim government of Dr. Amos C. Sawyer, where he served as legal advisor and I was then Minister of Justice and Attorney General.”“We attended the same law school, the Yale University in the United States of America,” said Justice Banks. “I realized in this great brain of his was a love for the law.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

LAC Defenders Win July 26th Friendly

first_imgThe 2-1 loss of Terminators FC of APM Terminals last Sunday against LAC Defenders FC in Grand Bassa County in a friendly soccer match revealed one thing to the visitors: the ability to play as a team.This was more so after LAC Defenders’ inside right Saygon John pushed his men forward with repeated harassment in the visitors’ defensive zone that caused goalkeeper Lawrence Washington more troubles as his right back Magako Kumeh and left back Benedict Teah struggled to find their rhythm.Though coach Joseph Sion, known during his playing days as Kofi Bruce, had plotted a strategy to bring the visitors down, which eventually came through Saygon John in the 25th minute when goalie Washington failed to grab his shot the first time, enabling the striker hit the back of the net with the goalie completely stranded, it was apparent that some level of fatigue had worked against Terminators FC.“We rode from Monrovia direct to LAC about 4 hours,” said an official of Terminators FC, “and we went right on the pitch to honor the match.” It was initially seen when hard-running striker Nicholas Sieh fumbled on his first ball, coupled with a rough pitch that made his ball control difficult. The initial exchanges did not give any problems to the home team in this half, as they hunted for goals that kept goalkeeper Washington busy.With 1-0 lead, the home team did not look back and pressed on their attacks. In their drive, left winger Lucretius Victor, inside left Saygon John, center forward Tengbeh Tambah and right winger Christer Bestman were having a field day.With their teeming fans cheering them in this half, they probed for goals that the visitors struggled to deny them. There were few flashes of seriousness from the visitors but they had to wait in the second half to draw the crowd on their side. The home team led the first half 1-0.Back from recess, LAC Defenders kept on the pressure and in the 48th minute, Terminator FC’s goalkeeper Washington could not decide whether to rush on a ball or not, allowing LAC Defender’s left winger Lucretius Victor an easy job when he lobbed the ball over his head to increase the tally to 2-0.The visitors began a new pattern of play, following the replacement of goalie Washington with ‘Chinese Goalie’ Jonathan Dambo. Initial strikes from the home team found a wall in Dambo and his performance gave his team-mate some confidence.Striker Nicholas Sieh played a supportive role, covering up when it was necessary on several fronts with assistance from inside left John Mayson, center forward Jumah Kollie and diminutive player Dakina Pederson. With their opponents resorting to man to man passes that delighted the crowd, LAC Defenders had to work overtime to prevent any damage as they were very often caught off guard but it was the visitors’ John Mason who scored the consolation goal in the 67th minute. It became apparent that the team had been rejuvenated, as the home crowd cheered every move the visitors made.But it was the home team, despite the difficulty to reorganize their attacks that got a goal that was cancelled because it was scored from an offside position as the game wore on. And from here it was the visitors that dictated the pace of the game when it was too late as the game was brought to the end by the central referee in a match that was played in celebration of July 26.APM Terminals (The Terminators FC): L. Washington (J. Dambo), Makago Kumeh, Benedict Teah, Sarr Bonner, Jeremiah Cole, Roland Coleman, Nicholas Sieh, John Mayson, Jumah Kollie, Oliver Kun, Dakina Pederson, Pepsi Carter, Jacob Dorbor, Rufus Doe.LAC Defenders: Cartlon Gray, Francis Kollie, Terrence Mulbah, Fayiah Saah, Emmanuel Gleh, Joeboy Halloway, Christer Bestman, Emmanuel Thomas, Tengbeh Tamba, Luc Victor, Saygon John.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

Mother Lake Laid to Rest in Duata

first_imgThe mortal remains of the late Ma Nyamah Martha Bwayou Lake was on Saturday May 23, laid to rest in her native village of Duata, a stone throw from her uncle’s village, Blameyea in Jorquelleh Administrative District #2 in Bong County.Ma Nyamah Martha Bwayou Lake was the niece to long serving Paramount Chief of Jorquelleh Chiefdom and former Representative of Bong County Barsee Kpangbai.She was born unto the union of Mr. Barkollie Bwayou and Ni Tonwon Bwayou on July 27, 1925, in a little farming community of Duata situated north of Gbarnga.How did she meet Rev. J. David Lake Sr?The Rev. J. David Lake, a classroom teacher, was teaching at the Muhlenberg Lutheran Mission in Millsburg, Monsterrado County and in the 1930s he was transferred to the Lutheran Mission in Zorzor, Lofa County.Rev. Lake later moved to Gbarnga, Bong County central Liberia and because of his fluent English, coupled with his clear writing skills, he became clerk to the influential Paramount Chief, the late Barsee Kpangbai, uncle of the late Ma Nyamah Bwayou Lake.Ma Nyamah Bwayou, from a subsistence farming family of Duata, was joined in holy matrimony to Rev. David Lake in 1941, which the union was blessed with nine children. The couple later moved to Suakoko town in Suakoko District and settled there permanently. There was no reason provided for their migration, but it is believed that it was because the town was the central location on the main Monrovia—Gbarnga highway.It was also learned that Pastor Lake provided a home and education for his wife since indeed she could not read and write.Pastor Lake was born on Water Street in the settlement of Harrisburg, Monsterrado County on June 30, 1909 unto the union of Mr. and Mrs. Alice Lake. His grandparents were Charlie and Georgiana Hayes of Harrisburg who migrated to Liberia from the United States.Rev. Lake served in capacities such as County Surveyor for Bong, worked with the Government Farm now the Central Agricultural Research Institute (CARI) as an entomologist. Ma Nyamah Bwayou Lake was a devout Christian and helped to educate several children whose parents were not financially able to send their children to school.Her children include Joan Allegra Lake Nathan, Rose-Marie Lake Cummings, Dr. Sodey C. Lake assigned at the Jackson F. Doe Memorial Hospital in Tappita, Nimba County, Dee-Zoe Lake, National Social Security and Welfare Corporation, Dardhe M. Lake, Julie S. Lake, Korto G. Lake, and J. David Lake Jr., with 25 grandchildren and 18 great grandchildren.The funeral service was attended by former Deputy Minister for Operations at the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ranney B. Jackson, and Bong County Superintendent, Selena Polson Mappy, among others.The funeral service was held at the St Mark’s Lutheran Church in Gbarnga, Bong County.Meanwhile, the Pastor in his funeral discourse admonished the surviving Lake family members to stick together, adding that in union strong, success is sure.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted On :
Category:

Thanksgiving Day Preachers Emphasize Forgiveness and Gratitude

first_imgTwo Liberian clergymen have emphasized forgiveness and gratitude as virtues that Christians need to adapt to in their daily living.Rev. Dr. George W. Zorbah and Rt. Rev. John Kunkun in their separate statements on this year’s Thanksgiving Day in Monrovia, said for God’s intervention to come to Liberia, Liberians must learn to live by these virtues because God instructed His followers to show gratitude and forgiveness.Rev/Dr. Zorbah, who serves as president of the National Grass Root Pastors Association, spoke first and stressed that many Liberians, though claiming to be Christians, find it difficult to forgive their compatriots.Liberia’s unforgiving culture, he said, is leading some to call for the establishment of a war crime court in the country, which would only target certain people, leaving out many more.According to him, the Liberia war was fought by all Liberians, directly or indirectly, stressing that those who did not take up arms to fight supported fighters to kill other Liberians.Biblically backing his statement, Rev. Zorbah said Jesus Christ, to whom Christians pray, urged his followers to forgive 70 times seven times, which according to him, makes forgiveness to be infinite.Regarding “justice,” he said the Christian bible stresses it to be acceptable to God. He said justice is also forgiveness because if one does wrong and seeks pardon from the victim, the victim needs to demonstrate forgiveness as Jesus prayed, “… forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.”He said many Liberians were glad to see former Liberian President Charles Taylor incarcerated in the United Kingdom following his trial in The Hague, yet, they have made no changes in their own lives since Taylor was incarcerated.He said the unforgiving spirit in Liberia is a curse that could serve as a driving force to the prevalence of catastrophe diseases including Ebola, noting, “Liberians claim to be Christians, but they are so wicked and envious. This is what sparks up God’s anger to punish people with plagues.”For Rt. Rev. Kunkun of the City of Light Church of God, the need to show gratitude to people when they do good cannot be over emphasized.Citing an encounter Jesus had with the ten lepers, Rev. Kunkun said that among them only one person returned to thank Jesus.Comparing it with the attitudes of Liberians, he said they are good at complaining and seeking favor, but when favor is shown them, they quickly forget those who have met their needs.“Liberians are good at seeking God’s intervention in times of crisis, but when the crisis is over, they draw far away from God and engage in things that will please their bodies. During the Ebola crisis, they were much close to God and promised to always serve Him, but as Ebola is gone now, churches are no longer packed as they used to be,” he said.He said showing gratitude brings “wholeness,” adding that for wholeness to come “upon Liberia,” citizens must learn to appreciate what God has done for them before asking for future needs.He also called on Liberians to show gratitude to people who show them favor, stressing that it serves as encouragement for them that are fond of well-doing.Meanwhile, the National Thanksgiving service held at the Centennial Memorial Pavilion in Monrovia yesterday was specially organized to memorialize Ebola victims.Clergymen and members of their congregations used this year’s Thanksgiving Day to express gratitude to God and pray for the government, neighboring countries and Ebola survivors.Yesterday’s ceremony attracted government officials, among them Vice President and Mrs. Joseph N. Boakai, Senators Jewel Howard Taylor and Prince Johnson, Acting Foreign Minister Elias Shinoyin, a representative of the Muslim community and Christians from various denominations. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Posted On :